This year, organisers said they made a special effort to be inclusive and accessible for people with disabilities.
By
Ben Winsor

24 Nov 2016 - 2:42 PM  UPDATED 24 Nov 2016 - 2:42 PM

This week, the Indian city Bangalore held its annual LGBT+ pride parade, organised by the Coalition of Sex Workers, Sexual and Sexuality Minorities' Rights group (CSMR). 

With bright colours, noisy motorbikes and lots of smiles, over 4,000 people marched from a city park to the Town Hall, according to media reports.

But the day also had a serious message, with attendees demanding homosexuality be legalised and action be taken on a number of recent attacks against LGBT+ Indians.

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The march was intentionally scheduled for November 20, the Transgender Day of Remembrance.

Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, introduced under British rule, criminalises sexual acts which are 'against the order of nature'. 

This year, organisers said they made a special effort to be inclusive and accessible for people with disabilities. 

“I work with people from across the spectrum and I see that if you are queer and have a disability then you are part of two minority groups, making you doubly marginalised," organiser Mathumitha Venkataraman told the Deccan Chronicle.

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