• Thi Hy Dang says she wants the best for her grandson. (Supplied)Source: Supplied
“We are living in a society where we should let them be themselves – as parents, all we want is to see our children happy.”
By
Ben Winsor

1 Dec 2016 - 1:58 PM  UPDATED 1 Dec 2016 - 5:35 PM

In their latest ad, which will be posted on Facebook tonight, Australian Marriage Equality features Vietnamese Australian Thi Hy Dang, ‘Ba’, and her gay grandson William Le.

“William number one, I love you,” Ba says, as William sheepishly responds that he loves her too.

Born in Hanoi, Ba migrated to Sydney in 1983 after four decades as a famous TV chef in Vietnam – she still sometimes gets recognised on the streets.

Ba’s always been very close to her grandson, taking care of him as a child while his father studied medicine and his mother worked.

“He was such a nice boy,” she says, “no crying or being naughty at all.”

Ba was over the moon when Le met his current partner, Michael Turkic.

“Michael is a good and decent guy and I'm happy with their relationship,” Ba says, “boyfriend or girlfriend is the same kind of love, there is no difference.”

“We are living in a society where we should let them be themselves – as parents, all we want is to see our children happy,” she says.

“I just want them to love each other and live together in happiness.”

Le, who is profoundly deaf, runs a diversity focused talent agency with Turkic - Ba is one of their talents.

Watch it now:

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