• Israelis and foreigners celebrate during the 17th annual gay pride parade at the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv on June 12, 2015. (AFP (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images))Source: AFP (Photo credit should read MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)
“Here in Tel Aviv, we are committed to celebrating each and every LGBTQ person and ally equally, so that we can all be out and proud together.”
By
Michaela Morgan

11 May 2017 - 12:50 PM  UPDATED 11 May 2017 - 12:50 PM

Tel Aviv is set to become the first major city to hold a bisexuality themed parade as part of its annual Pride celebrations, Advocate reports.

The theme ‘Let it B’ is designed to highlight bisexual visibility and “celebrate the acceptance of the bisexual community into the LGBTQ fold,” according to the Tel Aviv Pride Week website.

“Both in Israel and around the world, many bisexual people feel that they are an invisible group within the [queer] community,” said Efrat Tolkowsky, Tel Aviv-Yafo City Council Member in charge of LGBTQ Affairs.

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While there are signs that things are improving for LGBT+ Israeli people, it will be a long time before equality is achieved.

“Here in Tel Aviv, we are committed to celebrating each and every LGBTQ person and ally equally, so that we can all be out and proud together.”

The theme has also been welcomed by Liana Meirom, the international secretary and resources manager for Israel Gay Youth

“Bisexuals are part of the LGBT community but they are suffering from a kind of double discrimination," said Meirom.

“They are discriminated…by the heterosexual society but at the same time are seen differently in the LGBT community as well.

“We want our youth to feel welcome and loved no matter who they are and what is their sexual preference and love,” Meirom added.

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"For years, conversations with gay women and gay men didn’t make me feel like I was part of a community. There wasn’t usually intentional anger behind their words, nor were their literal words hateful, but something behind it screamed, 'you’re not gay enough'."

As well as the parade, Tel Aviv Pride includes parties and events held in the first week of June and is expected to attract over 200,000 visitors.

According to Aguda: The Israeli National LGBT Task Force, Tel Aviv has one of the largest LGBT+ populations in the world per capita—sitting at 32 per cent of the population.