• A woman views the Chinese social media website Weibo at a cafe in Beijing on April 2, 2012. (AFP (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images))Source: AFP (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
The move comes after the country’s internet censor categorised gay content as “abnormal sexual behaviour”.
By
Michaela Morgan

18 Jul 2017 - 11:00 AM  UPDATED 18 Jul 2017 - 11:00 AM

Users of the popular Chinese website Weibo have been expressing their frustration after the social media platform began removing innocuous LGBT+ content.

Videos that feature same-sex couples have been taken down from the site, after the China Netcasting Services Association announced new censorship regulations.

Online content will now be audited to ensure that videos with LGBT+ themes aren’t uploaded—luxurious lifestyles and excessive kissing have also been banned.

Pink News reports that people have been criticising Weibo’s decision to adhere to the ban.  

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On person wrote: “Aren’t people born equal? What right do you have to discriminate against others?”

Another added: “Aren’t homosexuals normal? Why do you push them to a corner?”

And it’s not just LGBT+ content that has been banned, Winnie the Pooh has also lost out against China’s internet censors, What’s on Weibo reports.

The illustrated bear became a political meme in 2013 after users uploaded side-by-side pictures of Pooh and Chinese President Xi Jinping.

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“My posts about Winnie have already been removed 5 times, so it’s really true,” wrote one Weibo user.

“What on earth has Winnie the Pooh ever done wrong!?” said another.