• Chris Sevier says he doesn't agree with the 2015 US Supreme Court ruling that allows marriage nationwide regardless of gender. (Getty Images)Source: Getty Images
We've heard of Apple 'fanboys', but this is ridiculous.
By
Mikey Nicholson

19 Apr 2016 - 11:44 AM  UPDATED 19 Apr 2016 - 11:50 AM

An American man has filed a lawsuit against a county district clerk, Texas Governor Greg Abbott and the state's Attorney General Ken Paxton for denying him the right to marry his Mac computer.

Chris Sevier says he doesn't agree with the 2015 US Supreme Court ruling that allows marriage nationwide regardless of gender.

Speaking to the Houston Press, Sevier questioned whether the law should "encourage that kind of lifestyle".

"The state is not doing anyone any favours by encouraging people to live that lifestyle. We have to define marriage,"  he said.

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Sevier is also filing his case in three other states and has plans to push forward in 12 more.

"[This lawsuit] is not a matter of who's on the right side of history,” he said.

“This is about who is on the right side of reality. Are we just delusional?”

Since the Supreme Court's decision last year, a number of southern US states have attempted to pass legislation making it easier for business owners and public servants with religious or moral objections to discriminate against same-sex couples.

Last month, an anti-LGBT rights bill signed into law by the Governor of Mississippi was compared to racial segregation.

North Carolina has also been the subject of boycotts by performers and businesses after its Governor signed into a law a bill that overrides all local ordinances that ban discrimination against LGBT people in regards to wages, employment and public accommodation.