Is spirulina all it's cracked up to be?
30 Jun 2016 - 12:08 PM  UPDATED 30 Jun 2016 - 1:21 PM

While medicine cabinet staples like paracetamol and Ural sachets offer pain relief, some chemical-based manufactured drugs can have side effects that impact your organs, sinuses and even your mental health. 

It's unsurprising then that some opt for the 'au naturale' benefits of mother nature to combat headaches, sleep deprivation and urinary problems.

But with the large number of vitamins and supplements on the market (so popular that they're even mixed into smoothies and baked goods), the problem is making sure that we know which ones are actually worth our hard-earned cash? 

Data Journalist, David McCandless and Web Developer, Andy Perkins have produced research found by health experts, Cochrane into a scale of evidence-based health supplements when taken orally by an adult with a healthy diet. 

They have not only integrated a "worth it" divider, but also highlighted the number of Google hits each supplement has.

Looks like there's evidence for folic acid and vitamin D supplements - but those trendy turmeric lattes might be all flavour and very little fix... 

To see larger image, go to here and to interact go here.

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