• Sorting It Out is a landmark study commissioned by NSW’s leading LGBTQ health organisation, ACON. (iStockphoto)
“Knowing more about men’s understandings and responses to relationship violence and abuse will help inform the development of messages, programs and responses that address these issue.”
By
Samuel Leighton-Dore

6 Jun 2019 - 3:04 PM  UPDATED 6 Jun 2019 - 3:29 PM

NSW LGBTIQ+ Health organisation ACON is seeking to gain a better understanding of domestic violence as it's viewed and experienced by gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (GBTIQ) men.

Teaming up with Western Sydney University, the organisation's Sorting It Out study will focus on GBTIQ men’s attitudes and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual assault - and they're looking for members of the community who are willing to participate in their consultation process. 

“ACON commissioned this research because there was a real gap in data looking specifically at the experiences of gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer men with domestic violence and sexual assault,” ACON CEO Nicolas Parkhill said of the study.

“Knowing more about men’s understandings and responses to relationship violence and abuse will help inform the development of messages, programs and responses that address these issue.”

Parkhill added that while some aspects of IPV among GBTIQ men is similar to the types and levels in the broader community, GBTIQ men face a range of specific and unique challenges.

“We know that the physical, emotional and personal costs of IPV and sexual assault in our communities are often the same as they are for heterosexual people. However, when it comes to the experiences of GBTIQ men, there are some aspects unique to that community that require its own set of responses and support,” Parkhill said in a press release.

“This study is important as it asks GBTIQ men questions that they have never been asked on a large scale before, such as about whether or not they would intervene in a friend’s abusive relationship, and whether there were ever excuses for violence. In order to fully support GBTIQ men and foster healthy relationships, we need to understand more about their experiences about intimate partner violence as well as their attitudes on relationships.

“These community consultation will gives us an important opportunity to hear from GBTIQ men on what kinds of support and actions they need to address IPV and sexual assault and to build healthy relationships.”

As well as the study and consultations, ACON will be launching a social media awareness campaign about the various channels of support available to men who have experienced IPV.

To view the report and find out more information about participating in the consultations, click here.

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