• How did Muslims around the world celebrate Eid? ((Photo by Issam Rimawi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images))Source: (Photo by Issam Rimawi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
From Mount Arafat to Sydney, Tokyo to Gaza, more than one billion Muslims marked the festival this weekend with friends and family around the world.
By
Ben Winsor

12 Sep 2016 - 2:14 PM  UPDATED 13 Sep 2016 - 1:13 PM

Last weekend's celebration of Eid al Adha is one of the two most significant days on the Islamic calendar. 

Translating to 'The Festival of Sacrifice', it marks the willingness of Ibrahim (Abraham) to sacrifice his son to god. The angel Jibra'il (Gabriel) intervened to inform him that the sacrifice was no longer necessary, the parable goes.

It's Islamic tradition to sacrifice an animal - such as a goat, cow or camel - and divide the meat into three parts. 

The family retains a third, another third is given to relatives and friends, while the remaining third is given to the poor. The donation of meat can also be made metaphorically, with gifts to charities. 

From Beirut to Sydney, Tokyo to Gaza, more than one billion Muslims around the world marked the festival this weekend with friends and family.

Beirut, Lebanon

Sydney, Australia

Ramallah, West Bank

Islamabad, Pakistan

Gaza City, Gaza

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Nablus, West Bank

Sana'a, Yemen

Dakar, Senegal

Mt Arafat, Saudi Arabia

Damascus, Syria

Amman, Jordan

Jakarta, Indonesia

Tokyo, Japan

Kolkata, India

Kabul, Afghanistan

Najaf, Iraq

Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Pictures courtesy of Getty Images/AP.

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