• Caminito Street is a major tourist attraction in Buenos Aires, Argentina and is filled with colourfully painted buildings. (Moment Editorial)Source: Moment Editorial
Colour is known for its' ability to influence human emotions, and in a world where drab hues are increasingly the norm, these buildings from across the globe are evidence of the capability colour has to arouse the senses.
By
Sam Carroll

20 Feb 2017 - 12:06 PM  UPDATED 20 Feb 2017 - 5:00 PM

A journal article published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology recognised the ability that saturated colours have to elicit higher levels of arousal, while brighter colours are more pleasant and less arousing than darker shades.

Rarely in the contemporary world of architectural design do we see vibrant tones with the potential to induce such emotions.

The vivid palate choices in each of the locations below have allowed for them to be recognised worldwide, standing out from the crowd while drawing visitors from across the globe. 

...It is believed that foggy conditions made it difficult for local fishermen to recognise their homes, so decided to paint them in bright shades to make them easier to locate.

Why the colour?

Each different location has distinct reasons for the choice of colour. 

In Burano in Italy, it is believed that foggy conditions made it difficult for local fishermen to recognise their homes, so decided to paint them in bright shades to make them easier to locate.

For Caminito in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the vibrant colours came about after mass-immigration between 1880 and 1930, with a large proportion of Italian immigrants, most of whom worked at the shipyard, continuing their tradition of painting the outside of their homes with leftover paint from work.

At other locations, such as Tuebingen in Germany, the designs simply reflect the style of the time they were designed, while in Iceland and Greenland practicality is the reason, with corrugated iron used due to its' durability in harsh, subarctic conditions.  

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