• In honour of Autism Awareness Month, take a look at this poem by 10-year-old Benjamin and how he views the world with Asperger's. (AAP)Source: AAP
In honour of Autism Awareness Month, take a look at this poem by 10-year-old Benjamin and how he views the world with Asperger's.
By
Shami Sivasubramanian

18 Apr 2016 - 2:44 PM  UPDATED 18 Apr 2016 - 4:17 PM

Last week, the National Autism Association shared a touching poem on their Facebook page.

Titled I Am, the poem shares the inner thoughts of 10-year-old Benjamin who has Asperger's syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder. 

His mother sent in the poem with the following message: "My 10-year-old son with Asperger's was asked to write a poem for school titled I Am' he was given the first two words in every sentence. This is what he wrote..."

Benjamin's words clearly share a depth and perspective that come with the challenges of facing autism.

I feel like a boy in outer space

I touch the stars and feel out of place

I worry what others might think

I cry when people laugh, it makes me shrink

Doesn't that just get you right in the feels?!

 

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