• Game of Thrones star Liam Cunningham with 16 year old Syrian refugee Hussam. (World Vision)Source: World Vision
Liam Cunningham has struck up a friendship with a 16 year old Syrian boy.
By
Alyssa Braithwaite

12 Oct 2016 - 12:28 PM  UPDATED 12 Oct 2016 - 12:34 PM

When Game of Thrones actor Liam Cunningham first met Syrian teenager Hussam in Jordan's northern city of Irbid in early September, he was struck by the "delightful, delightful human being".

Cunningham, who plays Davos Seaworth in the HBO television series, visited Jordan with World Vision as part of a project to raise awareness about the plight of refugees.

The Irish actor with impressed with the courage, determination and intelligence of the 16 year old school boy, who had lost family and friends in bombing attacks, but was teaching himself German in the hope of following his Dad to Germany.

Hussam fled for Jordan when his school in Syria was struck by missiles during his final exams.

"Within 30 seconds you know that this guy has a future, and I would imagine a very big future," Cunningham said.

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"He has a self-belief about him, joy in his heart, a twinkle in his eye, and I have no doubt about the horrors he’s seen and experienced. But it hasn’t taken away his humanity, if anything it’s made him stronger."

One month later, Cunningham surprised Hussam, who is now in possession of a German visa and living in a hotel in Stuttgart with his mother until they find accommodation, according to World Vision.

Hussam told Reuters he was "really happy, really happy" when Cunningham surprised him, adding, "It is like seeing my father."

Hussam is one of 4.7 million Syrians who have fled the country's war, which began in 2011. At least 250,000 people have been killed, and some independent Syrian organisations estimate as many as 450,000 people have lost their lives in the conflict.

Cunningham has commended Germany for welcoming refugees, and encouraged people to ensure Syrians are not forgotten. 

"I have enormous anger about what’s happening in Syria, the injustice of it, the disgusting behaviour of the various parties involved," he said.

"And to see what has come out of that, the lust for life, the desire for these children not to be lost, not to have a lost generation... As long as people keep thinking, people keep caring, and people keep wanting to do something about it… change is made."

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