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Federal MP Tim Watts was in India recently for the annual Australia-India Youth Dialogue.

By
Shamsher Kainth
Published on
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 - 16:16
File size
4.2 MB
Duration
9 min 13 sec

Member of federal parliament, Tim Watts supports the demand for introducing a long-stay visa for parents of migrants in Australia. Mr. Watts said that he would ‘feed’ his suggestions to the policy making system of his party.

“Having parents around allows families to invest in the human capital of the next generation. Having parents lets the next generation work and the generation next study and develop themselves so that they can make a bigger contribution to the society.”

“I have heard that from the community and I will feed it to our policy making system and when the time comes, there will be an announcement.”

Tim Watts was in India recently for annual Australia-India Youth Dialogue where during a visit to Mohali in Punjab, he said he would like to see more people coming to Australia from India.

Mr. Watts said he learned enormously by spending time with 15 “bright and highly talented” Indians. He said this is an investment that he would like to continue to make for many more years.

However, he says the despite having much in common, the economic relationship between India and Australia was yet to exploit its potential.  

“The same cultural and democratic values haven’t translated into the same economic oomph that we see in other relationships, particularly with China.”

“There needs to be more focus on the Indian-Australian diaspora. The relationship can be a lot larger than it is today. But it’s something that needs a greater political focus,” said Mr. Watts.

On lack of reflection of Australian multiculturalism in the federal parliament, Mr. Watts says more work needs to be done in that direction.

“I spend a lot of time with my Indian-Australian community encouraging them. I want to see young leaders coming up in Australia.”

“That’s something that the community needs to ask itself and that’s something the broader community needs to support and nurture because it’s difficult to break into these institutions. “