The story of a young British priest (Ralph Fiennes) brought up by a rigidly orthodox father, and an Australian woman (Cate Blanchett) who inherits enough money to buy a Sydney glassmaking factory. They are brought together in love and guilt by their passion for gambling, but they subjugate their unrequited desire to a bold, heroic gesture to transport a glass church to a remote Australian parish, where Lucinda’s friend is the priest, without a church. Oscar mistakenly believes that Lucinda is in love with the man, and sacrifices his own feelings in a noble but misconceived gesture to make Lucinda happy. He offers to lead the expedition that will deliver this astonishing gift to the outback village. An ultimately tragic journey.
 

4.5
Fiennes and Blanchett are screen magic; you will be drawn into their vulnerability and love.

I absolutely loved this film of Gillian Armstrong`s based on the Booker prize-winning novel by Peter Carey. It was never going to be an easy work to adapt to the big screen, but what a success those involved have made of it - this is a story of two eccentrics - Oscar - Ralph Fiennes - brought up a Plymouth Brethren for whom God will always be a factor in his life and Lucinda, a rich orphan whose love of glass leads her to invest in a glass factory in Sydney. Oscar and Lucinda meet on board ship where they discover a mutual love of gambling...... Oscar, poor soul, discovered his addiction some time earlier.....

There is something intrinsically moving about the fateful story of these two people - I love Oscar`s quixotic trek to Northern New South Wales to deliver a glass church to the man he believes Lucinda loves - I love Richard Roxburgh`s villain and the landscape - I love the way this film touched me in a terribly Australian way - it struck some atavistic core and I`m so grateful. Ralph Fiennes plays Oscar as a twitchily vulnerable creature, Cate Blanchett also brings to the surface Lucinda`s vulnerability - they made me care for these two odd characters so much. I`m not mad on the story`s resolution - it made me angry actually, but I can`t blame the filmmakers for that...... all the skill that Gillian Armstrong and her talented team - cinematographer Geoffrey Simpson, editor Nicholas Beauman, designer Luciana Arrighi bring to this film bowled me over - I cried, I`ll admit it...