Activists in northern New South Wales, who've declared an Aboriginal republic, say they will take their campaign to the United Nations.
By
Jeremy Geia

Source
NITV News
UPDATED 10:48 AM - 26 Aug 2013

The Murrawarri Republic may be the world's newest country, but for locals it's been around for tens of thousands of years.

The Republic's boundaries cross over northern New South Wales and Queensland - covering about 81,000 square kilometres.

Key leaders including Fred Hooper say the push for independence follows many frustrating years of inaction and broken promises.

Clan groups say the Queen of England, the Prime Minister and the Premiers of Queensland and New South Wales have been put on notice and given 21 days to respond to the declaration.

They say they will also be asking the UN to formally recognise their republic.

"You know according to our laws and customs, she (the Queen of England) does not now have any say over our country," says Fred Hooper from the People's Council of the Murrawarri Republic People's council of the Murrawarri Republic.

"And we've also asked her to produce a number of documents. We have asked her to produce a treaty."

The Murrawarri Tribe has its own constitution and bill of rights.

Fred Hooper says the new country will be inclusive and is offering non-Murrawarri people incentives, including citizenship and tax concessions.

"Certainly what we're saying at the moment it is the status quo...People will maintain their land."

The sovereign union camapaign says the declaration has now taken a step forward.

Michael Anderson believes it will spark a new wave of declarations similar to Murrawarri.

"The first flame has been lit, it's now burning. The flames will spread right throughout this country. And there's nothing Australia can do about it."

The Murrawarri's Council has been set up to look at a transition into the republic, including tribal law structures, industry and civil defence.