'Hijabista', 'Hijabify' and 'Hijab stylist' are just some of the terms redefining how Australian Muslim women are revolutionising their look, and emerging fashion labels are cashing in.
By
Widyan AL Ubudy

9 May 2014 - 9:51 PM  UPDATED 12 May 2014 - 9:28 AM

Gaining national and international recognition, one of the most popular Australian Muslim fashion labels is Hijab House.

Leading the way in faith fashion, Hijab House aims to provide stylish, modest clothing for young Muslim women, and the Australian fashion industry is taking notice.

The Banksotwn company's line is set to feature in this year's FASHFEST, Canberra's version of Sydney and Melbourne fashion week.

Producer of FASHFEST, Steven Wright, said, "We look for designs that reflects a contemporary Australian society and in doing that you end up with a lot of diversity. You know it reflects our multicultural heritage."

Tarik Houcher says he's nervous for his label's runway debut: "I had no idea FASHFEST was this big when we went to rehearsals I was gob smacked… I'm actually quiet nervous because it's a really big space so I have to deal with my emotions."

There are now over 20 stores open in Sydney catering for modest clothing, many of which are located in the Sydney suburbs of Bankstown and Lakemba.

The demand for modest yet stylish clothing is high among Australia's Muslim population. 

But the line between what's fashionable and religiously acceptable is a narrow one and Tarik says the balance isn't always easy.

"We try our best to design our clothing that kind of caters to both needs, making the woman feel confident and beautiful and making her feel secure and modest," he said.

Muslim Australian women are also turning online to form their fashion identity. Muslim fashion bloggers are attracting millions of followers and inspiring a unique modest style.

Tasneem Chopra, curator of the 'Faith, Fashion, Fusion' exhibition at Melbourne Immigration Museum is one such designer.

"My 'look' isn't connected to any one particular designer or stylist. My personal style could be described as vintage, with tribal elements," she said.

"This reflects my connection to my Kenyan background as well as my love for elegant and graceful lines. It's literally a fusion of styles that I believe reflect my personality."

Fashion bloggers like 'Dina-Tokio' from the UK and 'Dalalid' from Kuwait, are setting worldwide trends by incorporating popular fashion to comply with Islamic dress codes, and followers are taking their tips.

"I believe the Australian trend rise correlates with our embrace of social media platforms that have bought to bear the accessibility of fashion styles at one's fingertips, at virtually no cost," Tasneem told SBS.

"The 'blogging age' has made everyday consumers into self-appointed pundits and players in the social media fashion scene. Fashion is fair game."

For Muslim women, dress is a fundamental part of their Islamic lifestyle. It embodies a moral and behavioural code and although dress sense and style may differ globally, modesty remains the foundation for all Muslim women.