SBS Punjabi

Dawn services remember the contributions made by Australians to armed conflict

SBS Punjabi

Australia's Federation Guard Catafalque party at the Stone of Remembrance during the Anzac Day Dawn Service at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra

Australia's Federation Guard Catafalque party at the Stone of Remembrance during the Anzac Day Dawn Service at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra Source: Department of Defence


Published 25 April 2022 at 4:49pm
By Tina Quinn
Presented by Harleen Kaur
Source: SBS

As dawn breaks on ANZAC Day, the familiar sound of the bugle call brings together Australians and New Zealanders across the country and the world to commemorate those lost to armed conflict. It was 107 years ago today that Australian and New Zealand soldiers landed on Turkey's Gallipoli Peninsula during World War I.


Published 25 April 2022 at 4:49pm
By Tina Quinn
Presented by Harleen Kaur
Source: SBS


The ANZACs were defeated eight months later, after suffering great hardships and mass casualties. For some states this year's dawn services were the first public commemorations in three years, because of COVID-19.

Today is also the first ANZAC Day since Australian forces withdrew from Afghanistan.  

The Australian Navy's Principal Chaplain, Andrew Lewis, led the dawn service in the nation's capital, Canberra. He says Australians have plenty to be thankful for on this special day.

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"We give thanks today for the peace and security we enjoy in this land. We give thanks for those who have served this nation of ours. We say thank you to the families who allow their children, their loved ones, their mums and dads, to leave them to serve this great land of ours. We remember those who, in time of war and conflict, faithfully serve their country. We pray for those whose loved ones who paid the ultimate price serving Australia, those who laid down their lives to give us the freedom we have today." 

Politics has been put aside for the day and federal election campaigning put on hold, with Prime Minister Scott Morrison and Deputy Opposition Leader Richard Marles attending a dawn service in Darwin.

Anthony Albanese is currently isolating at home with COVID-19.

Mr Morrison says there are parallels between what Australia has done in the past, and what Ukrainians are doing in the present.

"A love of home, family, community, and country...a willingness to live for all of these things, but, if necessary, to sacrifice for something far greater than ourselves. This morning, far away from here, the people of Ukraine are doing exactly that. And, on this particular day, as we honour those who fought for our liberty and freedom, we stand with the people of Ukraine who do the same thing at this very moment."

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