Rita Ora to head a star-studded line-up including Electric Fields, G Flip and Montaigne.
By
SBS staff writers

24 Feb 2021 - 9:14 AM  UPDATED 24 Feb 2021 - 9:15 AM

Follow the conversation on SBS Australia socials #WeRiseFor #MardiGras2021 and via sbs.com.au/mardigras

The 2021 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras live Saturday 6 March 6pm AEDT on SBS On Demand or catch the full parade at 7:30pm on SBS and NITV.


A superstar line-up of performers, led by UK powerhouse Rita Ora are all set to appear at this year’s historic 2021 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

The international chart-topper behind hit track Anywhere and the new release Big will light up the Sydney Cricket Ground with her performance, along with soulful electronic duo Electric Fields, ARIA Award-winning songwriter Montaigne, and indie pop darling G Flip.

This year's event will again be helmed by drag icon Courtney Act, comedy superstar Joel Creasey, Network 10 Presenter Narelda Jacobs and stand-up genius Zoë Coombs Marr. As usual, the incredible team of hosts will walk at-home audiences through a stellar lineup of glittering performances, as well as interviews with celebrity guests.

Everything you need to know about the 2021 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras
Everyone is having to do things a little bit differently this year, and the Mardi Gras team is no different.

Speaking ahead of the 2021 announcement, Courtney Act said: “I can’t wait to get my heels on the pitch, wearing a lace-front in place of a baggy green, to celebrate this unique and vibrant Mardi Gras parade with my Indigenous, black, brown, trans, bisexual, asexual, intersex, lesbian, gay and queer siblings."

She added: "We’re going to bring all of the fun, glamour, heart, diversity and storytelling from the SCG and shout it loud and proud across Australia and around the world.” 

A very special Welcome to Country curated by Ben Graetz will take place at the start the show featuring John Leha, singer/songwriter Scott Hunter, plus Koomurri dancers, NAISDA dancers, and Buuja Butterfly dancers.

The Dykes on Bikes will then take to their hogs to perform a lap of the stadium, heralding the start of the glittering Parade, led with the First Nations and 78ers floats.

Follow the conversation on SBS Australia socials #WeRiseFor #MardiGras2021 and via sbs.com.au/mardigras

The 2021 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras live Saturday 6 March 6pm AEDT on SBS On Demand or catch the full parade at 7:30pm on SBS and NITV.

Everything you need to know about the 2021 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras
Everyone is having to do things a little bit differently this year, and the Mardi Gras team is no different.

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