Kobeba (also known as kibbeh and kibbe in other areas of the Middle East) is made with beef or lamb. It can be made as a slice or rolled into balls. Traditionally, pine nuts are hidden in the centre of each piece as a treat. 

Makes
30

Preparation

20min

Cooking

45min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 3.1 (44 votes)
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Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil 
  • 1 onion, finely chopped 
  • 500 g minced beef
  • 240 g (1½ cups) burghul (cracked wheat), soaked for 20 minutes, drained
  • pine nuts and shredded flat-leaf parsley (optional), to serve

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Soaking time 20 minutes

Preheat oven to 190°C. To make beef filling, heat oil in a frying pan over high heat. Cook onion for 3 minutes or until light golden. Add beef and cook, breaking up any lumps, for 8 minutes or until browned. Season with salt and pepper, and allow to cool.

Combine burghul, beef and onion in a bowl. Mix well with your hands until mixture is well combined. Season, then press half of the mixture into the base of a greased 35 cm x 21 cm x 5 cm baking dish. Spoon over the cooked beef filling evenly, then press the remaining burghul mixture over the top. Press down firmly. Using a small knife, score the top into 30 diamonds, then scatter with pine nuts, pressing them into the top beef layer.

Bake kobeba for 30 minutes or until cooked through and the top is browned. Cut into diamonds using the score marks as a guide and serve scattered with parsley, if desired.

 

As seen in Feast magazine, Mar 2012, Issue 7. For more recipes and articles, pick up a copy of this month's Feast magazine or check out our great subscriptions offers here.

Photography by Brett Stevens.