Traditionally, cooked broccoli is rolled in Greek cheese and then baked until golden. This recipe adds a new layer by incorporating a classic béchamel which brings all the flavours together. Serve with roast chicken or lamb.

Serves
4

Preparation

5min

Cooking

50min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 3.1 (50 votes)
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Ingredients

  • 1 kg broccoli, cut into large florets
  • sea salt and black pepper
  • 80 g unsalted butter
  • ⅓ cup (50 g) plain flour
  • 3 cups (750 ml) warm milk
  • 1 egg yolk, beaten
  • salt and black pepper
  • pinch of ground nutmeg
  • 100 g kefalotiri or kefalograviera cheese (see Note)

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

The following recipe has been tested and edited by SBS Food and may differ slightly from the podcast.

Preheat the oven to 180˚C.

Bring a saucepan of water to the boil. Steam the broccoli for 5 minutes or until just tender. Remove from the heat.

Transfer the broccoli to a lightly greased baking dish and season with salt and pepper.

Place a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the butter and, once foaming, add the flour. Cook, stirring constantly, for 2–3 minutes until the mixture starts to resemble wet sand. Gradually add the milk and continue to stir until the béchamel thickens and begins to bubble. Remove from the heat, add the egg yolk and stir well. Season to taste.

Pour sauce over broccoli, sprinkle with cheese and nutmeg. Place in the oven and bake for 35–40 minutes until golden brown.

Serve immediately.

© 2012 Maria Benardis

 

Note
• Kefalotiri and kefalograviera are hard Greek cheeses available from Greek and European delicatessens. Substitute parmesan if unavailable.

 

Photography by Alan Benson