A classic south-Asian dessert, these cardamom-scented fried-dough dumplings take a dip in a bath of rose-water before being served warm.

Serves
4

Preparation

20min

Cooking

10min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 4.9 (61 votes)
Yum

Ingredients

  • 150 g (1⅓ cups) full-cream milk powder
  • 50 g (⅓ cup) plain flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tbsp melted ghee
  • 125 ml (½ cup) milk
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 litre vegetable oil, for deep frying
  • thickened cream, to serve
  • crushed pistachios, to serve

Syrup

  • 400 g caster sugar
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 5 green cardamom pods, bruised
  • 50 ml rose water

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Resting time: 4 hours

  1. Sift the milk powder, flour and baking powder together into a bowl. Add the ghee and salt, then add the milk a little at a time mixing to form a firm dough (you may not need all the milk). Knead very lightly until a smooth, soft and pliable dough comes together. Return to the bowl, cover and rest for 20 minutes,
  2. Meanwhile, for the syrup, place the sugar, lemon juice, cardamom pods and 600 ml water in a saucepan and stir over low heat to dissolve the sugar. Simmer for about 5 minutes, then remove from the heat and stir in the rosewater.
  3. Heat the oil in a heavy–based saucepan to 160˚C. Roll tablespoons of the dough into balls. Fry the balls for about 5 minutes or until a deep golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack to drain for just 1 minute, then place them in the still - warm syrup. Allow to cool in the syrup and soak for at least 4 hours. Serve with crushed pistachios (and thickened cream – not traditional, but I like it).

 

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