This is the Dutch answer to fish and chips and is usually eaten with some boiled potatoes. For an alternative offering, we’ve stuffed these golden and crispy whiting fillets into little bread rolls that have been generously dolloped with tartare sauce, and have served them sprinkled with dill sprigs.

Serves
8

Preparation

15min

Cooking

15min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 3.9 (9 votes)
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Ingredients

  • 150 g (1 cup) plain flour
  • 1 tsp dried dill
  • 60 ml (¼ cup) milk
  • 250 ml (1 cup) sparkling mineral water
  • vegetable oil, to deep-fry
  • 8 whiting fillets, skin on, pin-boned
  • 8 bread rolls, sliced open
  • lemon wedges and dill sprigs, to serve

 

Tartare sauce

  • 2 tbsp baby capers in brine, roughly chopped
  • 8 cornichons, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup dill sprigs, roughly chopped
  • 300 g (1 cup) good-quality mayonnaise
  • 1 lemon, zested, juiced

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Chilling time 30 minutes

To make tartare sauce, combine all ingredients in a bowl. Season and refrigerate until needed.

Combine flour, dill, milk and 1 tsp salt in a large bowl. Add mineral water, whisking until smooth and thick. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Fill a deep-fryer or large saucepan one-third full with oil and heat over medium heat to 180°C (or until a cube of bread turns golden in 10 seconds). Dip 2 fish fillets into batter, allowing excess batter to drain off, then gently drop into oil and fry for 3 minutes or until crisp and golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. Scatter with salt, then repeat with remaining 6 fish fillets. Spread tartare sauce onto rolls, top with fish and serve with lemon wedges and dill sprigs.

 

Photography Mark Roper

 

As seen in Feast magazine, October 2013, Issue 25.