The Mexican answer to the Sloppy Joe, these bread rolls are filled with favourite ingredients such as beans and, in this case, chorizo and potato. They are then dipped in chilli sauce and fried, before being stuffed with lettuce, cheese and sour cream. Smaller versions are referred to as pambacitos.

Serves
6

Preparation

1hr
15min

Cooking

40min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 2.9 (20 votes)
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Ingredients

  • 1 x 7 g yeast sachet
  • 1½ tbsp caster sugar
  • 375 g (2½ cups) plain flour
  • 15 g butter, softened
  • 10 (60 g) dried guajillo chillies (see Note)
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled
  • 1 small white onion, roughly chopped
  • 750 g starchy potatoes, peeled, cut into cubes
  • 125 ml (½ cup) vegetable oil
  • 500 g fresh chorizo sausages, casings removed, finely chopped in a food processor
  • 2 cups shredded iceberg lettuce
  • 200 g (2 cups) grated queso fresco (see Note) or mozzarella
  • 240 g (1 cup) sour cream

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Resting time 2 hours 30 minutes

Place yeast, sugar, 75 g flour and 120 ml water in a bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside in a warm, draught-free place for 1 hour or until mixture bubbles.

Place yeast mixture, remaining 300 g flour and 2 tsp salt in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook and mix on low speed until a dough forms. Increase speed to high, add butter and beat for 3 minutes or until dough comes away from sides of the bowl. (The dough will be very sticky.)

Transfer dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap and set aside in a warm, draught-free place for 1 hour or until dough doubles in size.

Transfer dough to a well-floured work surface and divide into 6 equal portions. Roll each piece into an oblong shape. Gently pull ends of each oblong, twisting slightly to create a more oval shape. Place rolls on 2 baking trays lined with baking paper. Cover with a clean tea towel and set aside for a further 30 minutes, or until dough doubles in size. Preheat oven to 200°C. Bake for 10 minutes, then reduce temperature to 170°C and bake for a further 15 minutes or until golden brown. Allow to cool slightly.

Meanwhile, place chillies in a bowl and cover with boiling water. Set aside for 30 minutes or until soft. Drain, reserving 375 ml soaking liquid. Place chillies, soaking liquid, garlic and onion in a food processor and process until smooth. Transfer to a large bowl and set aside.

Meanwhile, place potatoes in a large saucepan of salted water over high heat. Bring to the boil and cook for 8 minutes or until just tender. Drain and set aside. Heat 2 tbsp oil in a large frying pan, add chorizo, and cook, breaking up pieces with a wooden spoon, for 4 minutes or until lightly browned. Add potatoes and cook for a further 5 minutes or until golden brown. Season with salt and pepper.

Cut rolls in half horizontally and, using your fingers, remove some bread from the centre of each half to create a hollow, leaving a 2 cm edge. Divide chorizo mixture between roll bases and sandwich together with the tops of the rolls, pressing down slightly.

Place 2 rolls in bowl of reserved chilli sauce and turn to coat completely. Heat 2 tbsp oil in a large frying pan over medium heat and cook rolls, pressing down to flatten, for 2 minutes each side or until golden brown. Repeat with remaining rolls and oil.

Open rolls and top with lettuce, cheese and sour cream then sandwich together and serve.

 

Notes
• Guajillo chillies are from Herbie’s Spices (herbies.com.au).
• Queso fresco (literally fresh cheese) is a soft, mild cheese made from cow’s milk. It is available from select South American food shops and delis, and online at fireworksfoods.com.au.

 

 

Photography Chris Chen

 

As seen in Feast magazine, March 2014, Issue 29.