Johnny Cakes can be cooked on a flat bed of coals in a fire, on a wire grill over an electric hotplate, in a regular frying pan, or on a cast-iron griddle plate (which is what I use).

Serves
2

Preparation

10min

Cooking

5min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 4.9 (49 votes)
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You can serve them with honey, jam and cream or Nutella for a sweet treat - but in this version, I use a dukkah made from native ingredients.

Ingredients

  • 150 g (1 cup) self-raising flour
  • pinch of salt
  • extra-virgin olive oil, for dipping

Native dukkah

  • 100 g toasted sesame seeds
  • 50 g roasted macadamias
  • 1 tsp toasted wattleseed
  • 1 tsp ground dried lemon myrtle
  • 1 tsp pepperberry
  • 1 tsp salt

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

  1. For the dukkah, place all the ingredients in a mortar and pestle or small food processor and grind into a coarse powder. Adjust the flavours to taste.
  2. Place the flour and salt in a bowl and make a well in the centre. Gradually add just enough cold water to make a soft dough. Knead the dough until soft and smooth - the longer you knead, the lighter your bread will be.
  3. Roll the dough into a log, then cut into 6 even-sized pieces. Roll the pieces into balls and squash into discs about 1 cm–thick.
  4. Heat a heavy–based frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook the Johnny cakes on one side until they swell and bubble up, then flip and cook for another minute or until just cooked through. Depending on your cooking method, you might need to do a little trial and error here to get the cooking time just right.
  5. Serve the Johnny cakes piping hot alongside a bowl of dukkah and extra virgin olive oil for dipping.

 

Adam Liaw cooks, laughs, and explores culture with some of Australia's most beloved in The Cook Up With Adam Liaw.

Photography by Danielle Abou Karam.