Tajarin is the Piedmontese dialect name for tagliolini or tagliarini (thin ribbons of pasta). They are particularly connected with the town of Alba – where this recipe, with its sauce of chicken livers, is also known as tajarin all’albese, where a topping of the famous local white truffle is added. Tajarin are served with many sauces, and one famed for its simplicity is sugo di arrosto, the drippings left over in the pan from a Sunday roast.

Serves
4

Preparation

15min

Cooking

10min

Skill level

Mid
By
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Ingredients

For the pasta

  • 300 g dried tagliatelle
  • 50-100 g parmesan, freshly grated
  • parsley, to garnish

For the sauce

  • 30 g dried porcini (ceps)
  • 50 g unsalted butter
  • 1 small onion, cubed
  • 400 g chicken livers, cleaned and cut into small cubes
  • 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • 50 ml Marsala or dry white wine
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Soaking time 20 minutes

Soak the porcini in water to cover for 20 minutes, then drain, reserving the soaking water.

To make the sauce, melt the butter in a pan, add the onion and cook for about 5-7 minutes, until it starts to turn golden.

Add the chicken livers, stir them around in the hot butter and fry for 3-4 minutes.

Add the drained porcini, tomato paste and Marsala, stir to combine and season to taste. If the sauce appears too thick, add up to 4 tbsp of the porcini-soaking water.

Meanwhile, cook the pasta in plenty of lightly salted boiling water until al dente, then drain and mix with the sauce.

Sprinkle each serving with freshly grated parmesan. Garnish with parsley.

 

Photograhy by Benito Martin. Styling by Jerrie-Joy Redman-Lloyd. Fork from The Bay Tree; glass from Vincino; bottle from Koskela; fabric background from Radford.