These pot-stickers are inspired by xiao long bao, which hide a soup-like liquid in their handmade wrappers. We’ve used store-bought gow gee wrappers for this recipe.

Makes
36

Preparation

30min

Cooking

15min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 3.7 (33 votes)
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Ingredients

  • 250 g minced pork
  • 2 tsp caster sugar
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce, plus extra, to serve
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp finely grated ginger
  • 1 tbsp chopped chives, plus extra, cut into 2 cm lengths, to serve
  • 1 tsp Chinese rice wine (shaoxing) (see Note)
  • 36 gow gee wrappers (see Note)
  • 3 tbsp vegetable oil
  • chilli oil (see Note), Chinese black vinegar (chinkiang) (see Note) and sliced bird’s-eye chillies, to serve 

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Combine pork, sugar, soy, sesame oil, ginger, chives and Chinese rice wine in a bowl. Season with salt.

Place 1 heaped teaspoonful of mixture in the centre of each wrapper. Brush edge with water. Fold over to enclose filling, then pleat edges, pressing to seal. Repeat with remaining filling and wrappers to make 36 dumplings.

Working in three batches, heat 1 tbsp oil in a shallow pan with a lid over medium-high heat. Add dumplings, pleated-side up, and cook for 1 minute or until bases are golden brown. Fill pan with 5 mm water, then cover with lid and cook for a further 4 minutes or until water has evaporated and dumplings are cooked through.

Drizzle over chilli oil, scatter over chives, and serve with Chinese black vinegar, extra soy sauce and sliced chillies.

 

Note
• Chinese rice wine (shaoxing), gow gee wrappers, chilli oil, and Chinese black vinegar (chinkiang) are from Asian food shops.

 

 

Photography Alan Benson.

 

As seen in Feast magazine, February 2014, Issue 28.