Also known as ‘bishop’s cake’, this is a variation of the traditional English fruitcake and is customarily eaten during the Christmas season. When thinly sliced, light penetrates the glacé fruit pieces, resembling the stained-glass windows of a church.

Makes
1

Preparation

30min

Cooking

1hr
30min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 2.8 (144 votes)
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Ingredients

  • 600 g mixed glacé fruit
  • 200 g (1 cup) red and green glacé cherries
  • 55 g (¼ cup) glacé ginger
  • 80 g (½ cup) brazil nuts
  • 50 g (½ cup) walnuts
  • 80 g (½ cup) blanched almonds
  • 50 g unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 165 g (¾ cup firmly packed) brown sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 tbsp Grand Marnier (see Note)
  • 35 g (¼ cup) plain flour, sifted
  • 75 g (½ cup) self-raising flour, sifted

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Preheat oven to 150°C. Combine fruits, ginger and nuts in a large bowl. Using an electric mixer, beat butter and sugar on medium speed until pale and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add liqueur and beat until just combined. Stir in flours until well combined. Pour batter over fruit mixture and stir gently until fruit is coated; don’t over-mix.

Grease and line the base and sides of an 11 cm x 21.5 cm loaf pan, extending paper 6cm beyond long edges of pan. Spoon batter into pan, press down firmly and bake for 1 hour. Cover with foil. Bake for a further 30 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes in pan, then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely. Store in an airtight container for up to 3 weeks.

 

Note
• Substitute orange juice.

 

 

Photography by John Laurie.

 

As seen in Feast magazine, December 2011, Issue 4. For more recipes and articles, pick up a copy of this month's Feast magazine or check out our great subscriptions offers here.