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Actress Alyssa Milano considers a career in politics

Alyssa Milano. Source: Invision

Charmed star Alyssa Milano, who popularised the #MeToo movement with a tweet, says she's thought about running for political office.

Alyssa Milano is an actress, activist, producer, and former singer, and the Charmed star might add politician to her plate.

When asked about a possible bid for political office at the BlogHer Health Conference In Los Angeles on Friday , she said, "It's something that I think about."

"It's something that I think about, for sure," said Alyssa Milano of a political career.
"It's something that I think about, for sure," said Alyssa Milano of a political career.
Invision

"It's not much different than what I'm doing now," said Milano, who has played an important role in bringing the #MeToo movement to Hollywood.

"I'd really love the staff. I'm doing this by myself now. I want that person where I'm like, 'Can you talk to me about immigration in a way that I don't have to go through so much research?'

"I would love it in that respect, but I don't even know what trajectory looks like. Do I start on a state, local level? If anybody has any ideas, tweet me," Milano continued. "2028? Maybe. It's something that I think about, for sure."

Milano also sounded off on issues related to #MeToo, white privilege, and what to do about men who have sexually harassed or abused people but continue to find work.

Just Thursday, Variety reported that X-Men director Bryan Singer, despite facing new accusations of sexual assault and misconduct, remains attached to direct Millennium Film's upcoming Red Sonja movie.

Milano acknowledged that it "might be an unpopular thing to say," but that fighting for women's rights includes "figuring out what the next step is for men that have been accused of sexual misconduct and abuse."

"Those men aren't just going to go away. Other companies are going to hire them, so what are we going to do to make sure that those companies actually have some protocol in place so that the women that also work in those other companies feel safe?" she remarked.

"Let's focus on that. What's the policy for men who have been accused of things that come back to a different job? I mean, we can't put them all on an island, and say, 'Yeah, they'll be fine.'"

She also said she's unafraid of criticism of women's movements, and that it can actually be productive.

Milano acknowledged the responsibility for activists to fight for marginalised and disenfranchised women.

"As white women, if we're not fighting for every woman, we're not going to get this done," she responded. "It really comes down to those of us with privilege and those of us with white privilege to take care of other people that don't have a voice."

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