Coronavirus pandemic to slow Australian population growth

The federal government's Centre for Population says the economic impacts of the pandemic are expected to reduce the number of babies born in 2021 and 2022.

Graphs tracking the national fertility rate, show it has been falling gradually since 2011 anyway but there's a sharper dip in 2021.

Graphs tracking the national fertility rate, show it has been falling gradually since 2011 anyway but there's a sharper dip in 2021. Source: Press Association / , PA Wire

Fewer Australian babies will be born over the next two years because of the COVID-19 pandemic, contributing to the lowest population growth rate since the First World War.

The federal government's Centre for Population has released a report saying couples are going to delay the expansion of their family because of the economic climate, resulting in fewer babies born in 2021 and 2022.

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The fertility rate is forecasted to drop to 1.59 babies per woman in 2021 compared to 1.7 in 2018.

By 2030, the long-term average is expected to settle at 1.62.

Graphs tracking the national fertility rate, show it has been falling gradually since 2011 anyway but there's a sharper dip in 2021.



Minister for Population, Cities and Urban Infrastructure Alan Tudge said while a lack of migration would be the main contributor to Australia's declining population growth, fertility rates tend to slow in times of economic uncertainty.

"Our population growth will be the lowest since World War I as a result of COVID," he said.

People in Australia must stay at least 1.5 metres away from others. Check your state’s restrictions on gathering limits.

If you are experiencing cold or flu symptoms, stay home and arrange a test by calling your doctor or contact the Coronavirus Health Information Hotline on 1800 020 080. News and information is available in 63 languages at 


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2 min read
Published 19 September 2020 at 7:05pm
Source: AAP,SBS