'It was about national security': Hanson defends Burqa stunt

Pauline Hanson has defended her entry into parliament dressed in a burqa, telling Sky News "We have to be logical about this. Listen to what the Australian people want."

A combined picture of One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson taking off a burqa during Senate Question Time at Parliament House in Canberra.

A combined picture of One Nation Senator Pauline Hanson taking off a burqa during Senate Question Time at Parliament House in Canberra. Source: AAP

She has drawn a stinging rebuke from the attorney-general and wide condemnation from the Senate after entering federal parliament wearing a burqa.

The One Nation leader took her seat during question time on Thursday wearing the Islamic veil, before removing it to ask Attorney-General George Brandis whether the government would consider banning the burqa.

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"We are spending $16 million on security around the Parliament House" Ms Hanson said. "We're building fences. We're changing security when you actually come into Parliamant House. And yet when I donned that burqa in my office .. I walked down the halls of paliament, down the stairs and at the base I met two security guards."

She went on to say: "And then going into the chamber .. Senator Whish-Wilson from the Greens, he saw me, he didn't know it was me. He saw a woman, or a person in a burqa. And then he comes up and he puts out his hand and I shook his hand.  He's never done that to me as Pauline Hanson the Senator."

"Then I went into the chamber, not at any time did anyone say 'can you prove who you are? Lift up the burqa and let's see if it's Pauline Hanson'".



The full-length garment, which covers the entire body and face, has been banned in several European countries including France, the Netherlands and Belgium as well as African nations Chad and Congo-Brazzaville.



German chancellor Angela Merkel has also called for a ban.

An angry Senator Brandis said the government would not consider such a ban.

"I would caution and counsel you with respect to be very, very careful of the offence you may do to the religious sensibilities of other Australians," he said.




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2 min read
Published 18 August 2017 at 7:30am
Source: SBS