Australia

Australia’s Indian community mourns man swept away at Coffs Harbour beach

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The search for a NSW man swept out to sea near Coffs Harbour as he tried to save three teenagers has been restricted to land as hopes of finding him alive fade.

An air and water search for an Indian man swept out to sea during a surf rescue attempt off NSW's mid north coast has been called off.

Surf life savers and police ended the search for Junaid Mohammed about midday on Wednesday at Moonee Beach near Coffs Harbour.

The 28-year-old was one of three men to wade into water on Monday evening to try to save three teenagers.

Mohammad Abdul Junaid is feared drowned and still  has not be found.
Mohammad Abdul Junaid is feared drowned and still has not be found.
Supplied

Two men - Ghouseuddin Mohammed, 45, and Syed Rahath, 35, - were confirmed dead on Monday after also wading into the water to save three teenagers.

The teenagers - girls aged 13 and 17 and a 15-year-old boy - survived the incident and were taken to hospital for observation.

The search for the missing man resumed Tuesday morning.
The search for the missing man resumed Tuesday morning.
9news

Police say foot patrols of the coast will continue "in routine taskings".

The Indian community in Australia is mourning the death of the two men, originally from Hyderabad, India.

"This is an unfortunate and horrific tragedy for the Indian community," Mr Syed Siraj Patel of the Indian Muslim Association of Australia (IMAA) told SBS Hindi.

"It was like a reunion for them. The families from Sydney and Brisbane had come together to spend holidays together. They had rented a place and were visiting the nearby beach when the tragedy occurred. 

“We at IMAA would like to send condolences to the deceased family members and friends.

“This is the second tragedy in two months and the Indian community is currently in shock."

Participants were taught the importance of swimming between the flags.
Participants were taught the importance of swimming between the flags.
Surf Life Saving New South Wales

The Indian families from Sydney and Brisbane were spending their holidays at Coffs Harbour and were visiting the scenic Moonee Beach, 23 kilometres north of Coffs Harbour in NSW when members of the family got into difficulties in the surf at about 6 pm on Monday evening.

As the Indian community of Australia mourns the men, Sydney surf life saving members met with about 100 new migrants and refugees to talk surf safety.

Migrants and refugees take part in the workshop at Tamarama beach.
Migrants and refugees take part in the workshop at Tamarama beach.
Surf Life Saving New South Wales

"Many of the attendees, from a diverse array of countries including Iraq, Iran, Syria, Afghanistan, India, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Taiwan and China, are part of the refugee community and have only been in Australia for a few months," Surf Life Saving NSW said in a statement.

"Most had not been to an Australian beach before and had limited beach safety knowledge."

The workshop at Tamarama beach on Tuesday.
The workshop at Tamarama beach on Tuesday.
Surf Life Saving New South Wales

Lifesavers said Monday's drownings "highlight the importance of this program in educating high risk groups in NSW to be aware of hazards at the beach".

Tamarama Surf Life Saving Club President Tim Murray said his club was "committed to playing a lead role in addressing drowning rates from the migrant and refugee community".

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Additional reporting: AAP

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