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New York considers laws requiring schools to teach hate symbols in class

The proposed legislation would require New York schools to teach students about hate symbols. Source: Getty

New York politicians are considering legislation that would require schools to teach students about “the meaning of swastikas and nooses as symbols of hatred and intolerance".

New York schoolchildren may soon have to learn about swastikas and nooses in class, in a bid to prevent hate crimes.

Democratic state Senator Todd Kaminsky has introduced a bill in the Senate that requires lessons on hate symbols to be included in the student curriculum for grades six through 12.

"The rise of antisemitic and racist acts rights here in Nassau County is deeply troubling," he said on Facebook on Tuesday.

New York Senator Todd Kaminsky announced the proposed legislation on Tuesday.
New York Senator Todd Kaminsky announced the proposed legislation on Tuesday.
Facebook

"Sadly, many young perpetrators do not really know the pain and bigotry these symbols convey.

"Education is key in the fight for unity."

The Long Island politician said there was a recent spike in hate crimes across the US, and urged his colleagues to back the legislation.

“As many of our youth are not aware of the hateful connotations behind swastikas and nooses, it is necessary for the legislature to mandate compulsory education in all schools across our great state in regard to the meanings of these two symbols of hate," the bill reads.

"Requiring students be educated in the significance of these displays of bigotry will go a long way toward fostering a more inclusive and tolerant society for all."
Swastikas found in a New York City school.
Swastikas found in a New York City school.
Twitter
The proposal comes as local police continue to investigate reports of seven swastikas found drawn on walls and a pavilion at the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park park in Nassau County earlier this week.
 
New York politicians are expected to debate the bill in January, and if passed, the new law could be in effect by September 2020.

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