Who is Shane Dawson? And why is the internet obsessed with his cat?

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The embattled YouTuber is trending again, which begs the question, how many times does a person have to be cancelled to stay cancelled?

Above: The Feed goes inside VidCon, Australia's largest YouTuber convention.

You might have noticed that the name Shane Dawson is trending on Twitter.

Twitter trends
The Feed

If you look up Dawson on Twitter this is the first thing you’ll be greeted with. Pre-warning, it’s a lot.

If you’re not familiar with the drama of YouTube culture (lucky you) then you might be a bit confused at why Dawson is denying relations with his feline.

It’s yet another effort to drag the internet star, this time with a snippet from his a 2017 episode of his podcast where he describes doing something very unsavory with his cat.

**Warning: if the above paragraph didn’t already tip you off, this clip is very yucky to listen to. If you do not like yucky things, even if they might be figurative, do not listen to this clip.**

Twitter has lost its collective mind at the revelation, with the reactions flowing thick and fast.

Dawson followed up his first wild denial with a seven part apology/explanation where attributed the whole misunderstanding to an immature sense of humour.

If Dawson’s tweets sounds exasperated that's because this is the third major ‘cancelling’ that he’s faced over content.

Back in 2014, he was called out for a long and detailed history with blackface and racial stereotyping stemming from when he was largely a character comedian.

He released an 11-minute video (horrendously long back in 2014), apologising for his past digressions and then disappeared for a little bit.

In the years that followed, Dawson started to move away from the shock and awe tactics that made him famous, instead focusing on longform documentary type projects.

Then in early 2018, a video emerged. It cut together multiple damning clips from Dawson’s podcast, including where he admitted to Googling the term ‘naked baby’, joking that he found the pictures “sexy”.

The video has since been expunged from the internet but it didn’t stop the accusations of pedophilia. .

Distraught with the accusations, Dawson once again posted a video apologising for the hurt he may have created - and denying that he held those views.

 

Considering the ridiculousness of this round of cancelling thrown against Dawson and his resilience (he recently passed the 20 million YouTube subscriber mark), it begs the question: how many times does a person have to get cancelled for it to stick?

Or is the benchmark for online outrage getting lower?

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