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Trump 'trying to divide us' using sport: LeBron

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LeBron James has previously expressed solidarity with the kneeling NFL players and voiced earlier criticism of Donald Trump.

Basketball great LeBron James on Tuesday accused President Donald Trump of intensifying racial divisions in the US.

"I believe our president is kind of trying to divide us," James, who is also a philanthropist, said in an interview with CNN's Don Lemon.

"He's kind of used sport to... divide us and that's something I can't relate to, because I know that sport was the first time I ever was around someone white. You know?" James said.

Trump has repeatedly criticised National Football League (NFL) players who kneeled during the national anthem to protest racial injustice, a protest begun by San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick in 2016.

LeBron James speaks at a news conference after the opening ceremony for the I Promise School in Akron, Ohio, Monday, July 30, 2018.
LeBron James speaks at a news conference after the opening ceremony for the I Promise School in Akron, Ohio, Monday, July 30, 2018.
AAP

James, 33, has previously expressed solidarity with the kneeling players and voiced earlier criticism of Trump.

He told his CNN interviewer that he "can't sit back and not say nothing" in the face of Trump's attempts at discord.

James, who ranks seventh in career National Basketball Association scoring, will play with the Los Angeles Lakers next season after leaving the Cleveland Cavaliers.

But he remains tied to Ohio, where on Monday an elementary school for at-risk youngsters opened in his hometown of Akron, through his LeBron James Family Foundation.

But on Tuesday, James said even the most successful African Americans face discriminatory attitudes.

This undated photo courtesy of Robb Aguirre shows a mural of NBA basketball star LeBron James who recently joined the Los Angeles Lakers.
This undated photo courtesy of Robb Aguirre shows a mural of NBA basketball star LeBron James who recently joined the Los Angeles Lakers.
AAP

"They always going to let you know that you are the n-word no matter who you are," he said.

"I think it's always been there. But I think the president in charge now has given people - they don't care now, they throw it to your face."

James was asked what he would say to Trump if he could sit across from the president. 

"I would never sit across from him," James replied. "I'd sit across from Barack, though," he said of Trump's predecessor Barack Obama, the first African American president.

James launched his I Promise year-round learning centre this week, devoted to some of the city's most challenged youngsters.

For James, who recalled missing 82 days of school as a fourth grader while he and his mum "looked for stability," the opening culminated years of planning by his family foundation.

The lobby of the I Promise School, a new Akron Public School funded by the LeBron James Family Foundation.
The lobby of the I Promise School, a new Akron Public School funded by the LeBron James Family Foundation.
AAP

"This means everything," James told The Associated Press in an interview before the public event.

"I think this is the greatest accomplishment for me because it's not just me...

"But these kids, this is for generation after generation after generation and it's for these kids; so it means everything."

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