Bullhorn capsicums, sometimes called bullhorn chillies or bullhorn peppers, are a long, sweet variety of capsicum with little to no heat. If you can’t find them, banana chillies make a good substitute just make sure they aren’t too spicy, unless you’re so inclined.

Serves
2

Preparation

15min

Cooking

35min

Skill level

Easy
By
Average: 3.3 (21 votes)
Yum

Ingredients

  • 4 eggplants
  • 6 bullhorn capsicums
  • ½ bunch parsley, roughly chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 cup breadcrumbs
  • ½ cup parmesan cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • ricotta salata, grated (see Note)
  • 4 tbsp olive oil

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional; if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml; 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml; 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

  1. Place eggplant on top of your gas burner. Cook eggplant over medium open flame (or under a hot grill), turning, until eggplant skin is blackened and charred, about 20 minutes. Place charred eggplants onto a plate to cool.
  2. Meanwhile, slice a small incision down the length of each capsicum and scrape out the seeds to create a hollowed-out cavern for the filling.
  3. Preheat oven to 180˚C
  4. Remove the charred skin off the eggplants, roughly cut into pieces and place them over a sieve to strain any excess water from them to ensure the mixture isn’t too wet. Once drained, chop the eggplant finely.
  5. For the filling, combine the eggplant, parsley, garlic, breadcrumbs, parmesan cheese, eggs and a pinch of salt in a large bowl.
  6. Spoon the mixture into the hollowed out capsicums and place them into a baking tray. Add a pinch of salt and a drizzle of olive oil over the capsicums.

 

Note

Ricotta salata is sold in some supermarkets and delicatessens. Pecorino cheese is a good alternative if you can't find it.

 

Stefano de Pieri explores all the wonders of the Murray Darling river system in Australia's Food Bowl.