SBS Hindi

Young Indian Australians reflect on ‘importance’ of Anzac Day

SBS Hindi

The Bhagat family at the Anzac Service in Melbourne on April 25, 2022.

The Bhagat family at the Anzac Service in Melbourne on April 25, 2022. Source: Supplied by Rosy Bhagat


Published 25 April 2022 at 3:20pm
By Vrishali Jain
Source: SBS

Many Indian Australians serve in the Australian army. This Anzac Day, the families of soldiers share what this national day of remembrance means to them.


Published 25 April 2022 at 3:20pm
By Vrishali Jain
Source: SBS


Highlights
  • Australia and New Zealand Army Corps Day, or ANZAC Day, commemorates the men and women who died in armed conflict while serving Australia
  • Many Indian Australians serve in the Australian army
  • Dawn services, marches and commemorative services on 25 April mark the 107th anniversary of the Gallipoli landings
Krishav Goel is a nine-year-old from the Gold Coast. 

His elder brother, Aradhya, is a cadet with both the Army and Air Force League. 

Krishav has become accustomed to seeing his brother participate in the Anzac Day dawn service each year on 25 April. 

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Krishav and Aradhya
Krishav Goel (R) with his elder brother Aradhya Goel Source: Supplied by Sweta Goel


For this reason, Krishav is also well acquainted with the symbols of this national day of remembrance. 

"During World War I, poppies grew across the battlefields where our soldiers fought and laid down their lives. The red petals denote their blood, and the black center symbolises the bullets," he says. 

People are seen in the Sanctuary at the Shrine of Remembrance placing poppies during Anzac Day in Melbourne, Monday, April 25, 2022.
People are seen in the Sanctuary at the Shrine of Remembrance placing poppies during Anzac Day in Melbourne, Monday, April 25, 2022. Source: AAP Image/Con Chronis


"It is also one of the most prominent symbols of Remembrance Day [11 November]," he adds.

Riya Bhagat is an 11-year-old whose dad is a Captain in the Australian Army. 

She says, "My Pitaji was deployed in Iraq with the Anzac forces. I grew up in a family of soldiers.

My brother and I understand the importance of this day.
For Rosy Kaur, a mother of two, Anzac Day is a poignant event. 

Rosy hails from an army family whose members across generations have served in the Indian, Australian and New Zealand armies. Her husband currently serves in the Australian Army.

She remembers the first Anzac service she attended more than a decade ago. 

(From L-R): Rosy Kaur with her sons Kaustav and Krishang, and her husband Lt Col Sandeep Bhagat on their first Anzac Service.
(From L-R): Rosy Kaur with her sons Kaustav and Krishang, and her husband Lt Col Sandeep Bhagat on their first Anzac Service. Source: Supplied by Rosy Kaur


"It was a foggy, cold morning. My elder son was nine years old and my younger one was seven. As my husband participated in the service, we looked on with pin-drop silence. 

"I could feel both my kids shivering on either side, but neither said a word," she recalls. 

Rosy's elder son, Kaustav, is now 21. 

He says it was that Anzac Day years ago when he decided he would follow in the footsteps of his father, uncles and grandfather. 

Bhagat Boys
kausatav Bhagat (R) and his brother Krishang Bhagat (L) with their father Lt Col Sandeep Bhagat (C) Source: Supplied by Rosy Bhagat


Kaustav, who is studying pharmacy at Monash University, wants to be a pharmacist in the Australian Air Force. 

He says, "I was brought up with the passion to serve the nation and the zeal to lay down one's life for the country. I love planes, and hence I want to join the Air Force."

Rosy says she could not be prouder. 

"It is a proud feeling to see my children carry forward the family tradition," she beams. 

Anzac Day is the anniversary of the day when Australian and New Zealand soldiers landed on Gallipoli in 1915 as part of the Allies' invasion.

Eleven-year-old Riya says it is important to remember all our heroes of the past and present. 

"Lest we forget," she says. 


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