Australia

'Let’s look at the pure facts': Pauline Hanson denies bushfires caused by climate change

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson says climate change has nothing to do with this summer's ongoing bushfire crisis.

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has rejected suggestions that climate change has contributed to the scale of this summer's unprecedented bushfires. 

Senator Hanson told Nine's Today show that a build-up of fuel on the forest floor due to a lack of hazard reduction burns was to blame instead. 

"As far as predicting the climate change... they can't even get my weather right and tell me if it's going to rain,' she said.

Firefighters in Victoria.
Pauline Hanson blames a build up of forest fuel over the last 30 years for the bushfires.
AAP

"They can't get it right over the next seven to 10 days and they're trying to tell me what it is going to be like in the next hundred years."

Her comments came after Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a royal commission into the bushfires would examine the role of climate change in the crisis, saying the government's climate policy would continue to "evolve".

Mr Morrison has been under pressure over his response to the bushfire crisis since the unprecedented fires broke out in November and his reluctance to acknowledge the link to climate change.  

The overwhelming scientific consensus is that Australia's fire season is growing longer and more intense due to the effects of climate change.

A landmark 2008 report by economist Ross Garnaut predicted bushfire seasons would start earlier, end later and be more intense due to climate change. 

"This effect increases over time, but should be directly observable by 2020."

Senator Hanson said examining climate change's impact on bushfires in Australia was a waste of time. 

"If you’re going to have a royal commission into it, throw bloody climate change out of the window and let’s look at the pure facts on why we’ve had the bushfires,” she said.

"Climate is changing, you can't tell me that taxing people, putting electricity costs is going to change the climate. The climate is changing pure to nature itself and our relation to the sun." 

The senator suggested people who were concerned about climate change should "take all the aeroplanes out of the sky" and stop driving cars. 

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