Australia

Milo Yiannopoulos banned from Australia over Christchurch comment

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Controversial figure Milo Yiannopoulos will not be touring Australia later this year.

Alt-right hero Milo Yiannopoulos has been banned from entering Australia after describing Islam as a “barbaric” and “alien” religion in a social media post about the Christchurch mosque terror attack. 

The controversial figure, who has a history of launching verbal and social media attacks on Muslims, was set to travel to Australia for a speaking tour later this year. 

Earlier this month, the Department of Home Affairs announced Yiannopoulos would be blocked from entering the country based on “character grounds”.

Three days later, that decision was overruled, off the back of considerable pressure from conservative MPs, including One Nation leader Pauline Hanson and former human rights commissioner Tim Wilson. 

British alt-right commentator Milo Yiannopoulos won't be coming down under.
British alt-right commentator Milo Yiannopoulos won't be coming down under.
AAP

But that position changed again, after Yiannopoulos’ widely shared Facebook post about the New Zealand terror attack. 

"People aren't radicalised by their own side. They get pushed to the far-right by the left, not by others on the right," Yiannopoulos wrote in the post.

"Attacks like this happen because the establishment panders to and mollycoddles extremist leftism and barbaric, alien religious cultures. Not when someone dares to point it out."

Milo Yiannopoulos has long been a controversial figure.
Milo Yiannopoulos has long been a controversial figure.
AAP

Australian Brenton Tarrant is accused of killing 49 people when he opened fire inside two Christchurch mosques on Friday.

A statement from Immigration Minister David Coleman on Saturday condemned Yiannopoulos’ comments.

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https://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/1459350083691/scott-morrison-on-christchurch-attack
https://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/1459350083691/scott-morrison-on-christchurch-attack

“Milo Yiannopoulos will not be allowed to enter Australia for his proposed tour this year,” it read. 

“Mr Yiannopoulos’ comments on social media regarding the Christchurch terror attack are appalling and foment hatred and division.” 

The statement also called the attack “an act of pure evil” against Muslims “peacefully practising their religion”.

 

Immigration Minister David Coleman.
Immigration Minister David Coleman.
SBS Hindi

“Australia stands with New Zealand and with Muslim communities the world over in condemning this inhuman act,” it reads.

The Immigration Department can block a visa based on character grounds if it decides there is a risk a person will commit a crime or vilify segments of the community.

Labor MP Tony Burke has taken to Twitter to praise the ban.

"Milo banned. Good. His overnight comments weren't that different from how he has always behaved. There was already enough evidence to ban him which is why the department had already recommended he be banned. The Australian tours for the world's hate speakers must stop," he tweeted.

The controversial British right-wing commentator still owes Victorian Police $50,00 to cover policing at a Melbourne event in December 2017, which saw violent clashes.

It’s not the first time Yiannopoulos has found himself in hot water over his social media posts – he’s also accused of trolling a Jewish journalist online.

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