• Torres Strait rapper Mau Power is celebrating 25 years since the Mabo decision with a powerful anthemic track 'Koiki' (AUM PR)
Listen to an exclusive of the brand new track by Torres Strait hip-hop artist, Mau Power, a musical tribute to Eddie 'Koiki' Mabo on the 25th Anniversary of the Mabo decision.
By
Emily Nicol

2 Jun 2017 - 10:15 AM  UPDATED 3 Jun 2017 - 1:46 PM

June 3, 2017 marks 25 years since the historic Mabo decision, overturning  the 'Terra Nullius' fiction, paving the way for native title land rights, and it all started with one man - Eddie 'Koiki' Mabo.

Torres Strait rapper, Mau Power, is hoping to reignite the conversation around First Nations self determination, strong culture and celebrating an incredible legacy with the release of his latest song 'Koiki'.

Patrick Mau 'Mau Power', a Dhoebaw man of the Guda Malullgal nations says felt he was on track as an artist when Gail Mabo told him she had tears upon hearing 'Koiki', his version of a song that she had written years ago for a feature film. 

"(Gail) had written a song with David Passi for a feature film and a couple of years ago whilst assisting her on another project, she told me that she had a song her for Dad and would I be interested in doing something with it. I was honoured and blessed."

Though it's been a while in the works, the intention was always to release the track on the 25th Anniversary of the Mabo decision. "We want to reignite the conversation around culture. Getting recognised nationally will really put the focus back on our own governance. The Mabo decision acknowledged our management systems, the way we maintained the environment and our own law, that was a first and globally empowering. It's time now to ask where do we go from here? How do we go forward?"

"We want to reignite the conversation around culture ... The Mabo decision acknowledged our management systems, the way we maintained the environment and our own law, that was a first and globally empowering. It's time now to ask where do we go from here? How do we go forward?"

 

Let us march in unity/ A single moment/ That defined our identity/ - 'Koiki' by Mau Power

The powerful track opens with spine tingling sounds of the Bu shell and features the vocal talents of Yorta Yorta rocker Benny Walker and Tongan/Kamillaroi soul singer Radical Son, whilst in the chorus, samples from Gail Mabo's original version.

"Koiki was my father's tribal name, the name everyone in Torres Straits called him," Auntie Gail explains. "This song tells the story of his journey, how he planted the seed for us to reclaim our heritage and for our children to grow up proud and strong, to know their place in history and know this land is where they belong, now and forever."

"This song tells the story of his journey, how he planted the seed for us to reclaim our heritage and for our children to grow up proud and strong, to know their place in history and know this land is where they belong, now and forever."

Mau Power says the idea of including Radical Son and Walker was a clear statement. "The story is not just significant to Torres Strait Islanders, it's also an Australian story, a First Nations story. Both of these artists are powerful voices who are on the same mission. It was important to collaborate and to be able to show the unity."

Check out the song exclusively on below. The track will be available for download as of tomorrow 3rd June and you can follow the movement from Mau Power's official website

The song will be appear on a forthcoming album to be released late 2017 and titled “Blue Lotus: The Awakening”.

Read These Too
Childcare centres learn acknowledgment of country
Childcare centres across the country are recognising the valuable role early learning has in helping children understand and learn about the history, culture and lives of Indigenous Australia.
Twitter launches Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags emoji
For the first time, Indigenous Australian flag emojis launch for Reconciliation Week.
How a lifelong friendship inspired a children's book about the 1967 referendum
The 1967 referendum brought a nation to its feet, but how do you explain its significance to children 50 years later? A Melbourne-based author has attempted to do just that, drawing from the real-life friendship of her older sister and her Aboriginal best friend.