• A memorial to TJ Hickey. (Facebook: David Shoebridge.)
On the anniversary of the death of TJ Hickey, his family have renewed calls for a parliamentary inquiry into his death. It has been 16 years since the teenager was thrown from his push bike and impaled on a fence in Sydney.
By
Keira Jenkins

Source:
NITV News
14 Feb 2020 - 3:57 PM  UPDATED 14 Feb 2020 - 3:59 PM

On the 14th of February, 16 years ago, TJ Hickey was impaled on a fence near Redfern after being thrown from his bicycle.

His family and their supporters have always maintained that TJ's death was the result of a police pursuit.

Each year on the anniversary of his death his family marches in his memory. This year they have renewed their calls for a parliamentary inquiry into his death.

"Today we're out here with the Hickey family for a young, Aboriginal boy, 17-years-old who was killed after a police pursuit  from innocently riding his bike," Elizabeth Jarrett, a supporter of the family, told NITV News.

"16 years later, I'm still here with the family, trying to get an independent inquiry in the parliament, after we've had three coronial inquests and three investigations, and this family still stands here 16 years later, no truth, no justice, no equality, no fairness."

Vivienne Morgan travelled from Walgett for the memorial march, saying she wanted to show support for her cousin, TJ's mother Gail Hickey.

"I just want justice," Ms Morgan said.

"It means a lot to me."

Marchers deliver petition for fresh investigation into ‘TJ’ Hickey’s death
More than 11,000 signatures have been collected in support of a fresh investigation.

While TJ's sister Marilyn Hickey said her family is still trying to get justice 16 years on from his death.

"Today is a march for my brother to get justice for him," she said.

"We're trying to get justice for him, we've never got no justice just yet, since he's been gone.

"We want equality, we just want people to give us justice."

Ms Jarrett said a parliamentary inquiry will be a significant step towards the Hickey family getting justice for TJ's death.

"Let's start with truth, let's start with accountability, let's start with Redfern police officers who were there on that day being charged with murder," she said.

Organisers said about 100 people turned out to march in memory of TJ, and Ms Jarrett said she hopes the numbers keep rising.

"It's good to see the numbers that are here," she said.

"It'd be really good to get the numbers even more. Get there and be with us, get there and be with this family."