• Lorelei Williams, right, whose cousin Tanya Holyk was murdered by serial killer Robert Pickton and aunt Belinda Williams went missing in 1978, wipes away tears (The Conversation/The Canadian Press)
ANALYSIS: Canada's National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls are decolonising the term "genocide".
By
Frédéric Mégret

10 Jun 2019 - 2:59 PM  UPDATED 11 Jun 2019 - 10:29 AM

The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) has come to the conclusion that Canada has committed genocide against its Indigenous peoples. This is buttressed by a dense and sophisticated 46-page supplementary legal analysis appended to the report.

International lawyers hardly have a monopoly over what is or ought to be characterised as genocide — the issue is also the subject of debate among historians, social scientists and the general public. Nonetheless, genocide as a legal term was the creation of international law. The recognition that it happened is legally significant.

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The supplementary legal analysis is careful to emphasize that it cannot be the last word on the matter, but it does come up with a series of strong arguments that draw upon international law.

The United Nations’ Genocide Convention must be interpreted in the light of evolving customary international law: states can be liable for genocide as well as individuals; one can commit genocide through omissions as well as actions; responsibility can be incurred for ongoing and disparate acts; members of a group can be killed in a variety of ways.

In my opinion, some international lawyers who might otherwise be sympathetic to the plight of Indigenous groups in Canada could nonetheless hesitate to label what happened as genocide.

They may emphasise, for example, the non-applicability of the Genocide Convention for much of the period during which it was allegedly violated in Canada. They may argue that only physical and biological killing of the group is covered by the convention. Or they may point out that Indigenous groups were purportedly not covered by the provisions of the Genocide Convention. They may opine that simply because something is not classified as genocide doesn’t mean it’s not despicable or worthy of condemnation.

 

Missing the point

Such hesitations are understandable, but they miss the larger point.

The attempt to grapple with genocide in Canada by the MMIWG commission is about more than simply applying international law to the facts. It’s also about decolonising the international law of genocide itself; that is, imagining what international law could be if it had not itself been implicated historically in colonisation.

Just as it draws on the authority of international law, the MMIWG report is also a subtle indictment of it.

International law defined genocide narrowly after the Second World War and largely reflected the unique experience of the Holocaust. Colonial massacres before then — such as the genocide of the Herero in southern Africa — or even at the time, like the Sétif massacre in Algeria, were not considered genocide or crimes against humanity.

The focus on individual criminal responsibility in the last two decades may have further reinforced a sense that genocide is committed by a few “bad apples.”

A determination of genocide in Canada, therefore, is partly despite the UN genocide convention’s failure to include Indigenous or gendered groups as protected minorities, its emphasis on massacres and its insistence on individual intent.

The convention makes it structurally difficult to conceptualise genocide as being anything other than the sort of industrial killing or large-scale massacre illustrated by the Holocaust and the Rwandan genocide respectively.

But if we accept that international law — which, by the way, historically sanctified colonisation — is not a sacred source of authority but part of a particular, historically and geographically situated tradition, then we can begin to imagine how we might rethink genocide.

 

Decolonising genocide

The MMIWG report suggests, in particular, that we ought to think of “colonial genocide” as different from “Holocaust genocide.” It is a genocide happening everywhere and all the time. It is a genocide that is at least as much the result of a slow war of cultural attrition than it is the product of massacres. The intent is present but it is structural. Responsibility is not only singular, not the work of a few bad apples, but collective.

We ought to think of “colonial genocide” as different from “Holocaust genocide.” It is a genocide happening everywhere and all the time.

Paradoxically, then, the challenge is not only to denounce a genocide but to denounce the limitations of the international law on genocide.

It is to question the authority to define “genocide” and to foreground victims’ experience in defining it. It is to insist that colonial genocide is genocide too. It is to recognize what happened in Canada over several centuries for what it is, despite the law’s best efforts to beat around the bush.

To decolonise genocide, then, is to decolonise how we comprehend genocide and to reimagine what international law could stand for.

There has been much debate since the MMIWG report’s release about what its legal consequences will be. The Organisation of American States has asked Canada to agree to the creation of a panel to further investigate the allegation of genocide.

This is helpful because it places the struggle for Indigenous rights within the broader scope of solidarity within the Americas. But the main lesson of the report may be more introspective and one that requires a slow reckoning with its analysis.

In the end, the conclusion of the MMIWG inquiry reflects the difficulty of, as the American writer Audre Lorde once put it, “dismantling the master’s house with the master’s tools.”

But in attempting to dismantle that house, the report makes it clear that the obligation to address genocide is, through and through, an obligation to decolonise.

The Conversation

 

Frédéric Mégret, Professor, McGill University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.